Sapa!

After a 30-minute bus ride from our Cat Ba Airbnb, a 15 minutes ferry ride (where the driver smashed a panel of our bus getting on the ferry), and an eleven-hour overnight bus ride, we made it to Sapa!  If Greyhound hasn’t upped their standards for traveling through the night, they should rethink their designs because these overnight buses in Vietnam are awesome! You get a fully reclined seat, air conditioner, pillow, blanket, some have toilets, and the prices are insanely low.  Our eleven-hour ride was $10 a person, and they don’t charge extra for baggage. On top of all of this, you either have a smooth ride or one that is a bit crazier. This first time was a bit crazy. You can board this bus after you buy an online ticket, or you can stand anywhere along a road or bridge and hail the bus down to just jump on and pay cash.  Obviously, if there are empty seats the driver will want to make extra cash to fill them. Every bus has a driver and an extra man that stands by the door to make sure people take their shoes off, and when passing potential passengers on the street, this man will open the door slightly and yell quite loudly asking if they need a ride. Our driver, however, wanted to fill every crevice.  Even after every seat on the bus was filled the driver continued to pick up passengers and make them lay in the aisle of the bus. I guess if the riders don’t mind then why should we? Except that when they would stop for pee breaks, you would either have to step around these people somehow, or wake them up every time. We arrived in Sapa around 3 am, but the driver let us sleep on the bus until 6 am.  Probably because hostels do not accept check-ins that early! When we exited the bus it was a chilly 40 degrees with humidity and a torrential downpour of rain. We stayed at Sapa Signature Inn hostel. It had two kitties that lived there so I was happy. The rain would let up in enough incremental measures for us to explore a little at a time when it wasn’t foggy of course. If the fog moved in, you couldn’t see more than 10 yards at a time.  Every town you visit, there will be a type of solicitor coming after you constantly. In Hanoi, it was the donut lady, in Sapa, it was bike renters, and here it is tribal women trying to sell trinkets or offer to be our guide. They were quite persistent. Even if we didn’t make eye contact, they were coming for us. Not taking no for an answer, they would follow us for quite a distance before letting up, and I’m talking like 5 minutes at a time.  We couldn’t hide from them either, they were on every corner, and sadly they had their young children doing the same thing. Some of the kids would even be carrying an infant on their back to gain sympathy. I learned with the kids, I could give them cookies and they would not bother me. The mothers, however, I would just hide behind Walter and throw him to the wolves! Things in Sapa were easily double and triple the price of the bigger cities, I guess that mountain town price increase happens everywhere.  One place tried to charge us $5 for a black coffee, which here, the coffee is so strong they give you maybe a quarter cup of a large size Starbucks. The food was awesome. There was a line of street food where they had raw meat on skewers (most likely not safe), and you would choose what you wanted, then it would be grilled for you. They had a knack for creating new food styles. The bakeries were the best. We had a fresh croissant style bread with pizza makings on top! Yum! A few things Vietnamese people love that I will have to accept are selfies and karaoke.  Every single person you cross is taking a selfie and the public just accepts it! A girl literally stopped traffic on a road just to stand in the middle of the street to take a selfie! At first, I waited to let them take their pictures, but so many of them are doing it all the time, I know just photobomb everyone now. We gots places to see people. Someone is ALWAYS singing karaoke! Luckily a renowned rule is quiet time at 10 pm, but until then, I suffer.  

Alas!  I made it 15 days with no bowel issues!  So at this point, I have a sinus infection, rhinorrhea (love this word), and the intrusive D.  Of course, Walter and I ate all of the same foods, but he is fine. We were able to see some rice terraces, but the high peak season for those is in a few months, and we hiked to the top of a small mountain to see the city view and “cloud garden”.  The French invaded this area many moons ago which in turn left quite a bit of beautiful french architecture. Another common article we would encounter is watching out for rabies from all of the strays. While there are a large number of cats and dogs running around (and goats), they are all super sweet and quite chonky.  So I assume even though they are galavanting around the city, I do believe they are still fed and loved by somebody. After this, we are finally headed to warmer climates! So until next time, off to Hue!

Jamie

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